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The AP Computer Science Principles Exam Page

Important Updates

Webinar for AP Digital Portfolio Updates

Watch recording of live event for instructions on how to access and navigate the AP Digital Portfolio, and new features.

Updated Scoring Guidelines for AP CSP Explore Performance Task

The revised Scoring Guidelines for the AP Computer Science Principles Explore Performance Task are available. While the structure is different, the performance task directions have not changed. The guidelines continue to focus on major requirements of the performance task. For additional information, review new student samples and accompanying commentary, visit the FAQ page or attend one of the webinars.

Student Submissions of the Revised Explore Performance Task

Note that students will still be well prepared to submit their Explore Performance Task if you used the previous Explore scoring guidelines to instruct them.

  • Students who have started on the Explore Performance Task can continue their work to meet the requirements in the new scoring guidelines.
  • Students who have already completed the Explore Performance Task are not required to complete a new task. However, they can review their work using the new scoring guidelines and modify their responses if they choose to do so.

Performance Tasks Due

April 30, 2017

Exam Day 2017

Fri, May 5, 12 noon

Exam Duration

2 hours

Assessment Overview

The AP Computer Science Principles Assessment consists of two parts: performance tasks and the end-of-course AP Exam. Both measure student achievement of the course learning objectives.

Encourage your students to visit the AP Computer Science Principles student page for assessment information and practice.

Access online score reports for your students.

Policies

Learn about late testing policies, and see all late testing dates.

Assessment Format

Through-Course Assessment

The through-course assessment is comprised of two AP Computer Science Principles Performance Tasks. The first task requires students to identify a computing innovation, explore its impact, and create a related computational artifact. The second task focuses specifically on the creation of a computer program through the collaborative and iterative process of programming.

For the through-course assessment, students will create digital artifacts — some examples include programs, digital art, or video — accompanied by a written response. Students will submit their final tasks via the AP Digital Portfolio, a Web-based software application that facilitates the process of collecting and transmitting AP CSP through-course performance tasks to the AP Reading for scoring. The AP Digital Portfolio contains user roles for teachers, students, and AP coordinators.

Download the AP Digital Portfolio Teacher User Guide for AP Computer Science Principles for instructions on how to log in, create classes, and upload performance tasks on the AP Digital Portfolio.

Download the AP Digital Portfolio Student User Guide for AP Computer Science Principles.

Download the recording to the AP Digital Portfolio Webinar Part I.

Download the recording to the AP Digital Portfolio Webinar Part II.

For additional information on the AP Digital Portfolio visit the AP Digital Portfolio site.

AP CSP Performance Tasks Sample Responses

A set of sample responses provides valuable insight into the expectations for the performance tasks.

End-of-Course AP Exam

The end-of-course AP Exam is a paper-and-pencil written exam. It is 2 hours long and will include 74 multiple-choice questions, presented as either discrete questions or in sets. There are two types of multiple-choice questions:

  • Single-select multiple choice: Students select 1 answer from among 4 options
  • Multiple-select multiple choice: Students select 2 answers from among 4 options

On both the through-course assessment and the end-of-course exam, students will exhibit their achievement of the course learning objectives and their application of the computational thinking practices.

Students will receive a final exam score of 1-5, derived from their performance on both the through-course assessment and the end-of-course exam.

Scoring Information

  • Two Performance Tasks | 40% of Overall AP Score
    • Explore — Impact of Computing Innovations | 16% | 8 hours
    • Create — Applications from Ideas | 24% | 12 hours
  • End-of-Course Exam: 74 Questions | 2 Hours | 60% of Overall AP Score
    • Single-select and multiple-select questions

The AP Computer Science Principles Course and Exam Description includes complete information about the performance assessment tasks and the end-of-course exam.

Sample Student Responses to Performance Tasks and Scoring Information

The following students' samples of the AP CSP performance tasks demonstrate the type of responses that would receive a high, medium or low score with the current performance task rubrics. We encourage you to use these samples as a way to promote discussion about the requirements of the tasks. Students cannot submit these samples to the College Board for scoring purposes. Also, although the performance task prompts have been included in these samples as guidance, the prompts do not need to be included in final student submissions.

Included for each task is the student performance Q&A, which contains feedback from members of the reading leadership that describes how students performed on the performance tasks, and that summarizes typical student errors.

Explore — Applications from Ideas

These samples were selected based on different types of responses that show a variety of scores in each row of the rubric and not necessarily on the types of computational artifacts submitted.

Sample Responses Scoring Guidelines Commentary Student Performance Q&A

Sample A: High Score

Sample B has been removed

Sample C: Medium Score

Sample D: Medium Score

Sample E: Low Score

Explore Scoring Guidelines

Commentary: High Score

Commentary: Medium Score

Commentary: Low Score

Explore Q&A

Create — Applications from Ideas

These samples were selected based on different types of responses that show a variety of scores in each row of the rubric and not necessarily on the programming languages used.

Sample Responses Scoring Guidelines Commentary Student Performance Q&A

Sample A: High Score

Sample B: Medium Score

Sample C: Low Score

Create Scoring Guidelines

Create Commentary

Create Q&A

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