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Home > AP Courses and Exams > Course Home Pages > AP Physics 1 Course Home Page

AP Physics 1 Course Home Page

Revisions to the AP Physics 1 and 2 Equation Tables
The AP Physics 1 and 2 equation tables have been revised to provide complete definitions of symbols. Please refer to these new, revised equation tables and share them with your students:


To learn more about the corrections, please see this document.

Expectations for Students
Please refer to the documents below for clarifying information about expectations for student work in AP Physics 1 and 2:

Welcome, AP teachers! Here you'll find resources for teaching AP Physics 1, including engaging instructional materials, sample exam questions, and current course information.

Essential Course Resources

AP Physics 1 Course Planning and Pacing Guides

Written by AP teachers, these versatile guides demonstrate a variety of ways to plan and pace the AP Physics 1 curriculum across one academic year. Each author brings a unique perspective to approaching the course based on his or her teaching context (e.g., demographics, schedule, school type, setting) and presents a host of ideas for activities, resources, and assessments.

  • AP Physics 1 Course Planning and Pacing Guide (.pdf/5MB)
    Becky Bundy, Madison County High School, GA — This course is taught at a public rural high school. The teacher uses a flipped-classroom approach to empower students to take ownership of their own learning. Most in-class time is used for inquiry-based lab investigations and peer-group problem solving.
  • AP Physics 1 Course Planning and Pacing Guide (.pdf/8MB)
    Kelly Burke, Woodstock High School, GA — This course is taught at a public suburban high school where the teacher allows students to work in groups with an emphasis on learning by doing. The course includes extended, inquiry-based, and research activities for continued learning outside of the classroom.
  • AP Physics 1 Course Planning and Pacing Guide (.pdf/1MB)
    Dolores Gende, Parish Episcopal School, TX — This course is taught at an independent high school where the teacher uses inquiry-based instructional strategies that focus on experimentation and collaborative learning. All laboratory investigations are designed by the students.
  • AP Physics 1 Course Planning and Pacing Guide (.pdf/800KB)
    Julie A. Hood, MAST Academy, FL — This course is taught at a public magnet school where the teacher uses inquiry-based instruction with a student-centered classroom. The teacher utilizes peer tutoring techniques.

Other Core Resources

AP Exam Information and Resources

The AP Physics 1 Exam, which debuts in May 2015, will assess students' achievement of the AP Physics 1 learning objectives. Each learning objective combines the science practices with specific content, as described in the AP Physics 1 and AP Physics 2 Course and Exam Description, Effective Fall 2014 (.pdf/7 MB).

A full Practice Exam reflecting the new course is available for all AP Physics 1 teachers in a secure location. Sign in to your course audit account for access.

AP Course Audit Information

Classroom Resources

Reviews of Teaching Resources

There are currently more than 250 reviews of Physics resources, including textbooks, Web sites, software, and more, in the Teachers' Resources area. Each review describes the resource and suggests ways it might be used in the classroom. Additional resources can be found on the AP Physics Teacher Community.

Professional Development

Background on Course and Exam Revisions

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